Monday, October 21, 2013

Pyramids


As a good Bruin, I have the immortal Coach John Wooden’s pyramid posted next to my desk. I use it in evaluations, I use it to write reference letters; I use it for personal motivation in my own climb towards competitive greatness. Where am I today? In this task? Which rectangle do I want to work on today? 
 

Today I looked at the pyramid, and marveled at its projection of the personal and unfettered nature of one’s upward trajectory. What about someone helping to open the doors for you? What about good coaching? Good mentoring? Where is resilience on this pyramid? What happens to the upward climb when forces are pushing you in the other direction? Is it even worthwhile to acknowledge, to consider the downward forces? I think it is. Success is about more than simply personal motivation, hard work, and peace of mind from doing your best. It is also about recognizing, acknowledging, and combating the anti-forces. I've documented some of them below, in my inverted pyramid.


I am only able to share this inventory of discouraging behaviors because there is—there must be—an additional pyramid to follow: A reminder of how-to-be: the behavior of healthy communities.

 














 I have added the new pyramids to my bulletin board. Wooden’s personal success pyramid and the community pyramid are the guide posts. The inverted pyramid is the tragedy—the reminder of what can go awry. I hate being negative, I really do. So as tempting as it is to deny, it is better to see it clearly in order to recognize it, call it out when you see it, and then actively work against it.





Friday, October 11, 2013

Notes From the Lab: Group Policies

 Some PIs post on their website explicit expectations for their group members.

Recently, Condensed concepts pointed out an example of one of these, and it motivated me to write my own.   I plan to share these with my students and postdocs, and post to my website.
This is a work in progress: please vet, add, subtract, etc.


MineralPhys Research Group Guidelines


1. Show up and work hard and take pleasure in a well-done job.

2. Do as well as you can: Strive for diligence and organization in your research, teaching and service.

3. Err on the side of over-communication rather than under-communication.

4. You will occasionally suffer. You will feel, at times, terrified, uncomfortable, frustrated. We all do. Welcome to the club!

 5. Take good care of yourself so that you preserve the part that is curious and excited about science. You will likely feel burned out occasionally, so learn physical and mental self-care skills & techniques that work for you.

 6. If in the end, the sum of excitement, fun, pleasure in the work exceeds the sum of discomfort, frustration, and tears---then by all means stay a scientist. If not, you may also stay a scientist.

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Departmental seminar series in the geosciences gender report, Part 2


Thanks everyone for your comments yesterday.
This data is mostly from top-ranked institutions; I used the NRC rankings as a guide.
Now that I have compiled this small amount of data
I find myself wanting more.
Also, I have questions.
Last year, one of my colleagues analyzed the data and declared no significant correlation between % women on the faculty and % women speakers.

I'm curious about other, hidden correlations.
Is the data--both aggregate and distribution--consistent with a random sampling from the pool? 
Is there a correlation between NRC rankings and gender distribution?

I think this would make a really nice research project for an undergraduate in the social sciences. 
I will keep my eyes open for a collaborator for this.

Part 2
Department seminar series in the geo sciences, by gender.

Ohio State University
women
men
4
5

Arizona State University
women
men
4
9

Stanford University
women
men
0
7

University of Minnesota
women
men
4
8

Penn State
women
men
2
9

Purdue
women
men
1
9
(note: not including PhD candidates)

University of Arizona
women
men
1
17

University of Michigan
women
men
1
5

University of Chicago
women
men
2
7

U MD State Park
women
men
0
8

U Illinois
women
men
3
9

Yale
women
men
4
9

U Wisconsin Madison
women
men
3
4

U South Carolina
women
men
6
7

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Departmental seminar series in the geosciences gender report, Part I.


Department seminar series in the geo sciences, by gender.


This is the first part of the series, examining the gender breakdown of various Earth Science department seminars/colloquia.

For part 1, I mostly looked up institutions that I've been associated with, or are notable for other reasons (e.g. I've given talks there recently).

If the list of speakers for a seminar series was difficult to find, then I did not include it in the list.
(inscrutables include: UC Davis, UC Riverside, UCSD, etc. etc.)

UCLA you broke my heart.

More meta-analysis to come, after part 2.

Please submit your own institution's stats so I can add them to the compilation.
Thanks!

UCLA
women
men
0
8


UC Berkeley
women
men
3
11

UC Santa Cruz
women
men
2
7

CalTech
women
men
2
7

Northwestern
women
men
3
5

Princeton University
women
men
4
5

Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory
https://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/
women
men
3
7

MIT
women
men
1
10


Harvard
http://eps.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/event-type/department-colloquium
women
men
2
8