Wednesday, October 2, 2013

Departmental seminar series in the geosciences gender report, Part I.


Department seminar series in the geo sciences, by gender.


This is the first part of the series, examining the gender breakdown of various Earth Science department seminars/colloquia.

For part 1, I mostly looked up institutions that I've been associated with, or are notable for other reasons (e.g. I've given talks there recently).

If the list of speakers for a seminar series was difficult to find, then I did not include it in the list.
(inscrutables include: UC Davis, UC Riverside, UCSD, etc. etc.)

UCLA you broke my heart.

More meta-analysis to come, after part 2.

Please submit your own institution's stats so I can add them to the compilation.
Thanks!

UCLA
women
men
0
8


UC Berkeley
women
men
3
11

UC Santa Cruz
women
men
2
7

CalTech
women
men
2
7

Northwestern
women
men
3
5

Princeton University
women
men
4
5

Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory
https://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/news-events/events/colloquium/
women
men
3
7

MIT
women
men
1
10


Harvard
http://eps.harvard.edu/calendar/upcoming/event-type/department-colloquium
women
men
2
8

8 comments:

  1. Cambridge
    http://talks.cam.ac.uk/show/index/15106 (dynamic site, data taken today)
    women: 4
    men: 7

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hampton University Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences Seminar:
    Women: 2
    Men: 8

    ReplyDelete
  3. Geological Society, London, 2013 lectures
    Women: 3
    Men: 7
    http://www.geolsoc.org.uk/en/Events/Shell%20London%20Lectures%202013

    ReplyDelete
  4. Oxford University Earth Sciences, Autumn 2013
    Women: 5
    Men: 3
    http://www.earth.ox.ac.uk/news_events

    ReplyDelete
  5. University of Wisconsin - Geosciences Weeks Lecture
    Women: 3
    Men: 5

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops, sorry, here's the URL:
      http://geoscience.wisc.edu/geoscience/newsandevents/weeks-lectures/

      Delete
  6. Definitely does not need to look like that...I made a point of having a 50-50 split of genders the term I organized the colloquium, and then left a spreadsheet with over a dozen female and minority scientists who could be invited in the future.

    For Goldschmidt this year, to make a point, my session co-convenors and I only invited women and minorities as speakers to highlight the tendency for conveners to typically do exactly the opposite...

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for all the comments. My crack stats colleague did a quick & dirty analysis of this (limited) data set, and found that it seems (to first order) to be consistent with a random sampling of the ~mid-career faculty in geosciences. I thought the distribution looked bimodal: that departments either come close to 50% women speakers or 0% women speakers. But that idea didn't seem to hold statistical water. So the problem seems to mostly be the pool.

    But yes. Keep up the good work making extra effort to invite less-heard voices to give talks. Spread the wealth. Actually its academic equivalent is recognition--so be a recognition Robin Hood. I think it's healthier for all.

    ReplyDelete