Monday, June 23, 2014

What I Did On My Sabbatical


Last winter one of our visiting department colloquium speakers asked me what I was doing for my sabbatical?* My answer was overheard by my department chair who decided the time was right to inform me—then and there over celebratory wine and dinner at a colleague’s home—of the requirement to write up an official report on what-I-did-on-my-Sabbatical. So I’ll take care of that official part right now:

Dear Dean---,
Thank you so much for granting me sabbatical time in Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 (with a quarter in-service during winter 2014). I came home from work most days by 3 pm. Every day that my son and his friends stayed off the marijuana, I considered my sabbatical time well-spent.  

Yours always,
Professor MineralPhys

Plus there was the normal professional stuff, posted in my annual inventory.

That’s the short version. But what else did I do, besides weekday afternoons spent grilling quesadillas and baking cookies for my son and his friends to enjoy while they played video games instead of doing their homework?

There was a year spent trying to learn stat mech, transition state theory, and isotope theory. Lots of equations, derivations, making up constraints. Even if it comes to nothing, it felt like time well-spent.

I spent some time here. And some time here.

I had fun. How much? At one point, my brain thought: Is it possible to die from too much fun? My brain also answered this thought, which is what I really learned on my sabbatical, which I clearly needed to learn:
How to work hard while also not feeling guilty when I’m not working.

*The phrasing is often “where did you go for your sabbatical?” Asked that way, with its inference of spouse with flexible work life who can watch over the family, irks the bejeezus out of me. One of my colleagues didn’t buy my “sabbatical is a state-of-mind” response. Dear colleague who told me it’s not a real sabbatical if I don’t go to a foreign country for the year: I hope that after your life of science is done, you will be permanently assigned to the giant quesadilla grill in the sky.

Prof. Kavner during a sabbatical moment (Photo Credit: Prof. Kavner's Dad)


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